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This is a copy of my question about Watership Down, which I have since deleted.

I have the 2005 version of the book Watership Down. I have just read it, and also, I have read an offline review about Watership Down. The summary doesn't seem to fit the exact details I have read, however, leading me to think there are different versions of it. Can anybody confirm (or disprove this)? It said that: It was a good book, but the sign was a bit mean, and a very obvious indication of future events. Could it have been an edited book? Or even abridged?

This is a comparative question. What's wrong with it that it has a score of -3?

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    I downvoted because you don't give the name of the "offline review about Watership Down", or explain how we can get access to said offline review. If you want an answer to this question, you're going to have to explain how we can read the "offline review". – user111 Mar 7 '17 at 19:44
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    Unfortunately, I can't because as I stated, my friend wrote it, and also, their name is on the review quite clearly, which I am not allowed to share. @Hamlet, I am sorry. – VortexYT Mar 7 '17 at 20:00
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    If that's the case, then I unfortunately don't think this question is a good fit for the Stack Exchange model. We would need to be able to access your friends review to give a good answer your question. – user111 Mar 7 '17 at 20:07
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I didn't downvote, but I considered voting to close your question as "unclear what you're asking".

Why downvote?

The tooltip for the downvote button says "this question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful".

  • It must be quite easy to find at least some information on how many editions of Watership Down there have been. I put "watership down editions" into Google and immediately came across this list, which doesn't answer your question but is at least a start. Including some basic research like this in your question would have improved it.
  • Your question is also kind of unclear, since you don't say where you found this review or go into much detail about what it said, so it's very hard to tell what the evidence is that there might be different versions of the book.
  • Finally, "not useful" is more subjective, but someone might have downvoted it because they saw it as a trivial question and didn't care about the answer.

(Again, I didn't downvote, so all of this is just speculation on why people might have done so.)

Why close-vote?

I was vacillating about whether or not to vote to close your question. As mentioned above, it's quite unclear; without more details about the review, it's hard to see what the motivation is for your question. If there are different versions of the book, we'd have no way of saying which of them was likely to have inspired that review, which makes the question hard to answer.

My strong suspicion that there aren't different versions - that all the various editions of the book differ only in cover and packaging, and not in the essential text of the novel - is the main thing that stopped me from voting to close. If this suspicion is correct, then your question is answerable.


I hope this helps! I wrote it up pretty quickly, but hopefully it might help you to understand why people had issues with your question.

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