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17 votes

Is it necessary for answers to literary analysis/meaning questions to be supported by external quotes?

No. Of course it's not always necessary. If you can come to a sensible, well-reasoned conclusion simply by arguing directly from the text, that's absolutely fine - in fact that's the 'purest' form of ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 73.6k
15 votes

Should we treat critics' opinions higher in answers?

Judge on ideas, not status I don't think the opinion of a critic makes all that much difference as to whether an answer is valid or not; the only real factor that differentiates them from others is ...
Aurora0001's user avatar
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13 votes
Accepted

How do we answer questions asking for prior examples if there are none?

Unanswerable questions are not bad. In fact, if you can prove a question is unanswerable, that's gonna make for an awesome answer. And if you can't prove it, well, then we're just guessing it's ...
BESW's user avatar
  • 5,012
11 votes

Should we treat critics' opinions higher in answers?

The optimal answer, on many Stack Exchange sites, is written by an expert - or, to avoid having to define that word, a person who is very well acquainted with the subject and specific material at hand....
HDE 226868's user avatar
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8 votes

Is it necessary for answers to literary analysis/meaning questions to be supported by external quotes?

Answers should offer reasonable support, explaining "how" and "why" wherever possible. What that means changes depending on the claims being made. If you're drawing your answer strictly from the text ...
BESW's user avatar
  • 5,012
6 votes
Accepted

Guidelines for good story-ID answers?

Explain how your answer matches the question as stated. Any story-ID question is going to include some data points about the story. Don't just say "this is the book you're looking for"; show how each ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 73.6k
6 votes

When dealing with stories set in a shared universe, how much weight should be placed on information found in the other stories?

Standback's answer is excellent on the general principle, but I thought it was worth paying some more specific attention to the issue you raise, and perhaps even looking at some examples. What do ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 73.6k
5 votes

Should we start deleting answers that don't support their claims?

Firstly, what do we mean by "low quality answers"? Obviously this needs to be clarified, because "low quality" without context can be a highly subjective evaluation. In the context of this meta post, ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 73.6k
4 votes

When dealing with stories set in a shared universe, how much weight should be placed on information found in the other stories?

It seems to me that explaining the statuses of the different works, drawing attention to support or to contradictions, would be part of a good answer. There's too much nuance here for a breakdown of ...
Standback's user avatar
  • 3,148
3 votes

When dealing with stories set in a shared universe, how much weight should be placed on information found in the other stories?

This question is based on the theory that we interpret literature by treating it as if it were documentary evidence for a fictional universe, and that our task as readers is to determine facts about ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
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3 votes

Should we start deleting answers that don't support their claims?

As Rand al'Thor opened his answer, the real question here is "what is a bad answer"? Of course we should be deleting bad answers: Zyerah makes an excellent point that "this isn't reddit". So: what do ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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