22

There shouldn't be any strict requirements about this. Some questions, such as reading-order questions, are best asked before someone has read the books. But even for plot explanation or literary analysis questions, it shouldn't be necessary to have read the book before asking questions about it. If someone who hasn't read the book posts a question to ...


14

The best answers cover both in-universe and out-of-universe reasons. The character did X because they didn't yet have the information that Y would be better and W wouldn't be consistent with their temperament. The author did it this way because Y wouldn't have given the right symbolism and W would have cut the story short after 10 pages. Questions asking ...


11

The Stack has a "no expletives" policy, but several sites have found that where clarity is at stake quoted expletives should be permissible. I think we could pretty much copy-paste the RPG.SE decision on this subject: [...W]e should stick to the standard SE "no expletives" policy to promote a friendlier and more civil site. As on English....


11

Wherever you want. As an active member of both SFF and Lit, I faced this decision also. Lately, I've been more active here, because this is a fledgling site and needs lots of good questions. SFF is a well established site, with lots of questions and answers and people, while we're just getting started. So for now, I've been mostly posting questions on Lit. ...


10

It depends on whether it makes sense as a single, unified question. The deciding factor here can't be a number -- "It's OK to ask about the inspiration of five characters, but six is too many." That would be arbitrary. This rests upon a simple (but subjective) test: is this one single question, that makes sense and will have a single cohesive answer? Or is ...


4

What is a way to communicate these preferences without being rude? Make it clear that they're your preferences, without implying that anyone who doesn't share the same preferences is wrong or foolish. For example, in this question, you originally wrote, "It requires a large amount of research to answer correctly. If you answer with the first thing that ...


3

I'd say we should treat them similarly. The only difference between literary analysis questions and more diegetic questions is that the former is more advanced than the latter. Questions that are more diegetic in nature are just as important and valuable as more technical questions, and if these questions aren't off-topic, I don't see why we should ...


2

Looks perfectly fine to ask about all of them at once. As you mentioned in the question, Were other characters apart from Alice inspired by real life people? talks about a lot of different characters - all of them except for one. So we have precedent. In addition, there is also the chance that the author has made a blanket statement about a whole lot of ...


2

or should the song in questions have lyrics that have at least some literary merit? That's a very slippery slope you're looking at there. How could we possibly define 'literary merit' in an objective way ... and once we started considering only works of sufficient 'literary merit', where would we stop? The issue of literature snobbery has already come up, ...


2

Every kind of song lyrics are on topic. Take a look at How will we avoid literature snobbery? - this seeks to prevent exactly that: only accepting 'serious' literature. We don't only deal with 'serious' literature here - we deal with all types of literature. Nowhere at Are songs and poems on-topic? does it say that we only accept 'serious literature lyrics'. ...


1

Questions for which answers that are entirely in-universe are, for the most part, non-"literary". (i.e. minutiae about a plot point or a character is not "literary" unless it can be connected to a theme or other work with similar elements.) However, if such questions are related to "literary fiction", there is only the Literature forum to address them, ...


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