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Are questions about the themes of a work Too Broad? In general, no. Analysing the themes present in a work is part of literary analysis, and we've already had questions about such things on this site. Is the question "What are all the themes in this work?" Too Broad? In my view, yes. Unless the work is really short (and maybe not even then), it would be ...


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Starting from a broad premise like "What are the themes in I, Robot?" would generally be considered a good taking point for a round-table discussion, but it's not really the type of question that can be answered definitively in the context of this type of Q&A. I used the word definitively here because Stack Exchange was designed to handle a type of <...


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I agree with you that the second one probably shouldn't have been closed. With regards to the first question, I would've voted to close it as it's currently phrased, too. In its current state, it really isn't clear what the OP's asking - it's more of a rant than a legitimate question or proposal. One of the close reasons for Stack Overflow Meta is "This ...


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To answer the title question ("Should questions be closed if they don't provide context for a quote?"): it depends. If the question has sufficient detail (a quote that appears not to require context, a very famous quote, a quote that's easily found*), then it should be fine. If there's some amount of important detail missing from the question, then the ...


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*removes mod hat* This is not a statement of site policy but just my personal opinion; vote on it as you see fit. I don't see a big problem with these comments. Arguments in favour of allowing them: We get to help people at least a little. Their question isn't on-topic and has no place here, but we don't need to spurn them to go away completely empty-...


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