19

Flag 'em. It might be arguable whether they count as "rude or offensive", but at best they're "not constructive". This falls under the same basic rules of courtesy as this recently-featured main meta post: just as you should be able to respect others' political viewpoints, you should also be able to respect their choice of literature. If you want to argue ...


12

[link text](http://example.com) is how you do it. It works in posts too. If you go to post a comment, there is a link to a 'help' page. That page1 says: Comments support only bold, italic, code and links; in addition, a few shorthand links are available. _italic_ and **bold** text, inline code in backticks, and [basic links](http://example....


7

From main meta: [meta] – link to the current site's Meta; link text is the site name, "Literature Meta". Does nothing in comments on Meta itself. [main] – like [meta], just the other way around. [edit] – link to the edit page for the post the comment is on, i.e. /posts/{id}/edit. Link text is "edit" (capitalisation is respected). [help] ...


6

The way the Stack Exchange (SE) system (that Literature, this website, is a part of) works, commenting on other people's posts is a privilege, awarded when a user reaches 50 reputation points. One of the reasons for this is keeping the comments constructive: SE is by no means a social media, and reputation is at least partly intended to be a measure of a ...


3

Technically, you're right: comments are supposed to be used for feedback on the question, not for suggesting answers. And I know some SE sites take a hard line on 'answers as comments' and tend to delete them on sight, directing the commenters to the answer box instead. But this is one of those network-wide 'policies' which is more than a little malleable ...


3

Personally I never use comment templates, always writing comments from scratch to welcome new users to the site or suggest improvements to posts. No disrespect to those who use templates, but I feel people are more likely to feel welcome and respond positively to a comment which clearly comes from a fellow human; if they're new to Stack Exchange, they may ...


3

There is a helpful userscript Auto Review Comments which I use (on many other sites in the network) for exactly this purpose. It contains some stock comments useful on any site (e.g. the ones similar to the comments generated by the Low Quality Posts review queue) but it's also possible to upload your own ones, so you don't have to type them over and over ...


2

I am in favour of creating such a list or repository. I have seen similar lists on other sites: English Language Learners, English Language and Usage, Spanish Language SE Being able to copy and paste (and tweak, as the case may be) would save a lot of typing.


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