Hot answers tagged

34

No. As we do on Movies, we don't dictate which site has "precedence" or "priority" over the other. If someone asks a question here that's On-Topic here, it should stay here, even if it's also On-topic on Sci-Fi. See the discussion on Movie's Meta, I think it should serve as a good guide for us here as well: What are our thoughts on the practice of using ...


30

I think they should be On-Topic. There can be quite extensive character analysis, plot explanation, etc. related to comics that would add quality content to the site. AND, not all comics fall into the sci-fi/fantasy umbrella of sff.se, so we can offer a home to those that don't already.


30

Identification questions are like... The cabbage, radishes and shredded carrots that some sushi shops put on the platter before stacking up the meat & rice. They make the plate look nice and full, and they're something to chew on once you've eaten all the meat... ...But no one goes to a sushi restaurant for shredded carrots. I've never heard a group of ...


26

I think this can work, if we all agree to not disparage anyone. Once again, I swoop back to Mythology Stack Exchange. We deal with everything from tales from the Sumerians to the Quran (a relatively modern work of mythology). And you know what? We don't give a wet slap if any particular myth is grounded in fact or fiction. We just ask and answer questions ...


25

On-topic questions should not be migrated (possible caveat: unless explicitly requested by question's OP?). Rationale for that is laid out in SE reference on migrations. Caveat: questions which are precise duplicates of established SciFi.SE questions. They are a separate discussion on Meta Offtopic questions of high quality that are on-topic on SciFi.SE ...


24

No. Book recommendation questions have a tendency to invite multiple answers, none of which is more correct than any other. Both the answers themselves and the votes cast on them will likely be based more on subjective opinion than expert knowledge or verifiable correctness. Such questions would fall under the "primarily opinion-based" close reason ...


20

Absolutely not. Rand's answer is good, but I thought I'd add something. I moderate Hardware Recommendations, wherein we deal with recommending computer hardware to people who ask for it. The one thing I can say about that job is - it's a massive handful. After a year and a half of beta our scope has only just solidified, but we haven't yet managed to ...


20

I don't see a reason against such topics. On Stack Exchange, folks are expected to behave maturely, and that involves covering topics that - well, require some maturity to handle. For the same reason, I don't think we should avoid works about, say, violence, war or drugs. I think that we'll see questions that cover these topics tangentially, and we may even ...


20

This is the . . . eleventh time I've been in a Stack Exchange site from its beginnings in private beta or before, over two and a half years. And let me say this: what you've brought up is something that they've all faced, in some form or another, as they came into this world kicking and screaming along with a bunch of us who had no clue where we were going. ...


19

Poems should be on-topic without further qualification. For hundreds of years, poetry was nearly the only type of literature produced, and some of the greatest works of literature are poems. I favor allowing questions about songs as long as they are literary questions. Questions about word choice, symbolism, historical context, or narrative structure of a ...


19

TL;DR: Yes. Very much so. Why are they good? Reading-order questions are possibly the most practically useful questions this site will ever see. Questions about literary analysis, or plot points in specific works of literature, can be very interesting, and may well be the types of question that attract the experts every SE site wants to have; but learning ...


19

I think they should be on-topic. There's a masters thesis on Frank Miller's Sin City. Another thesis on Alan Moore's Watchmen, not to mention a whole book titled Watchmen and Philosophy: A Rorschach Test. A thesis on The Killing Joke is present as well. Surely, not all graphic novels live up to the standards of the mentioned works. Yet, it is entirely ...


18

If the question is on topic here, leave it here. If for some reason we may think the querant will get a better answer there, we may direct them to SFF in a comment, but since the question is still on topic here, there's no reason to migrate. Besides, as a new beta, we need all the quality questions we can get.


17

Yes. As these questions would be relating to a specific work or author, there is a defined scope. Depending on the age of the work, there may be interviews and articles discussing this with the author. This would give us "canon" / "word-of-god" definitive answers not based on speculation. As you mentioned these are about already written works and not "how ...


17

I would say that they would be on-topic, but only insofar as they relate to an author's literary life. We had a similar issue on History of Science and Mathematics early on. Would a question about Einstein's favorite style of eggs be on-topic? Obviously not, because, as far as we know, eggs did not have any role in Einstein's scientific work. Extrapolating ...


16

Yes, but we should demand quality answers, as well as quality questions. Questions should show work done, otherwise be downvoted as "not sufficient research". If too many crappy homework questions get posted, we should institute formal moderation policies, similar to quality controls required for questions like ID on MTV, or Software Rec in general, or ...


16

Don't ask for a recommended reading order, ask for things that inform a choice of reading order Let me back up a bit. Why do people want to ask about reading order in the first place? In 99% of the cases, you can't possibly go wrong with publication order. This is the order hundreds, thousands or millions of people (had to) read the texts when they were ...


15

You may want to sit down. This is going to be long. Identification questions are helpful. Unlike, say, literary analysis, or questions about plot points in specific works of literature, identification questions are almost always inspired by an actual problem someone needs to solve. In this sense, they fit the Stack Exchange model better than many other ...


15

What is an expert? First off, let's acknowledge our weaknesses. We, the current userbase of this site, are not 'experts' - in the sense that (as far as I know) none of us are literature professors, or even have degrees in literature; none of us have jobs in libraries; none of us are professionally involved with literature. But you know what? That doesn't ...


14

Yes, these should be on-topic. As I've already said on a few other scope meta questions, why not? They're written works, and they can be just as interesting and worthy of analysis as paper books. In fact, many books are published in both forms: as a paper book and an e-book. It would be silly to allow questions about one but not the other. Note again that ...


14

Yes, because they are literature. Of course, this is debatable, but since Maus has won a pulitzer, it's pretty clear, that comics are being considered literature and so are manga. Which makes them on-topic. On the other hand are there other SE's dealing with these contents (Sci-fi or Anime & Manga), which I dont think is a problem, if someone decides to ...


14

I vote to welcome any mythology questions that are connected to a written source. (But see also Does Oral-Literature count as literature here?) Using this as a distinction, only the first of your example questions remains on-topic. If it is not directly answerable from relevant work, we should be allowed to draw from other mythos as well. However, general ...


12

Are questions about the themes of a work Too Broad? In general, no. Analysing the themes present in a work is part of literary analysis, and we've already had questions about such things on this site. Is the question "What are all the themes in this work?" Too Broad? In my view, yes. Unless the work is really short (and maybe not even then), it would be ...


11

No Generally SE is a not a good fit for recommendations. Pure shopping questions are even worse. The applicability of the answer for future readers is very doubtful. So let's not do that. I fully agree with the close voters and down voters.


11

This is an issue of whether to be inclusive or to be exclusive, because in my view to focus on literature is to include literary analysis, but to focus on literary analysis is to exclude much of literature. I believe that based off of the questions we have. and it is my belief that is what should define us: not the stated will of the people, but rather their ...


11

I think this is off topic, and that it's Literature Stack Exchange's version of a problem Role-Playing Games Stack Exchange resolved in 2012: real-world research questions. I'd like to summarise the issue briefly, so you can check if there's parallels for yourself. On RPG Stack Exchange we deal with tabletop roleplaying games like Dungeons & Dragons, the ...


10

No. The literature definition already goes beyond just being "professionally" published, else everything ever "professionally" published would be on-topic. So the same standard of differentiating "professionally" published non-literature from "professionally" published literature should be applied.


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