10

I think this is off topic, and that it's Literature Stack Exchange's version of a problem Role-Playing Games Stack Exchange resolved in 2012: real-world research questions. I'd like to summarise the issue briefly, so you can check if there's parallels for yourself. On RPG Stack Exchange we deal with tabletop roleplaying games like Dungeons & Dragons, the ...


8

Yes, your original version of the question was perfectly fine. This was already decided here. If I were to have seen Hamlet's edit in a review queue I would not have approved it as it significantly changes the meaning of the question, therefore I believe it is perfectly fine for you to return your question to its original state.


6

Maybe you're approaching it from the wrong direction? There's no reason why a question about Eric Clapton's dog should be on-topic for a literature site. But looking at it from the opposite point of view, this question is not just about Eric Clapton's dog but about the influence of a particular work of literature. A question about whether a name in the ...


4

Yes, this question would be OK for Literature, as long as you ask it from the point of view of investigating the poem. For example, "Is this description of streets in Larkin's poem accurate?" You might get answers along the lines of "yes it is [with evidence]" or "no, but Larkin describing streets like this makes poetic sense because ...


4

No I'm not sure this would be on-topic anywhere for SE, because it's opinion-based ("Should X do Y?"). It also seems to be fishing for a "yes" answer. This is about writing ("Should writers do this while writing?"). We analyze pre-existing literature (which does not, in general, include informational news articles) and related ...


3

Question #1: should be closed. Although the question is posted with reference to specific book(s), it's asking about any books which use particular elements: Have there been any works of literature featuring [...] has anyone ever made up stories based upon such [creatures]? This seems no better than the original examples of bad recommendation ...


3

I think it's a good question and shouldn't have a negative score. Reading order is definitely on-topic, and this particular case is one where the answer isn't obvious: New Spring comes first in in-universe chronology (a prequel), but it's in the middle in terms of out-of-universe chronology, and involves concepts and characters not introduced in the main ...


3

I can't speak for the downvoters since I'm not one of them, but I can think of a couple of possible reasons why your post may be being poorly received. At very first glance, it sounds almost like a recommendation question. Your title starts with the words "Is there a good ... ?" Most questions starting with these words would probably be off-topic here as ...


3

From the help centre: To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where … every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?” your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?” there is no actual problem to be solved: “I’...


2

I think question #2 should be closed on the basis of being "too broad" and have voted as such. For my birthday, one of my kids bought me a copy of Podkin One-Ear, a fantasy novel aimed at children. I read it and enjoyed it, for its imaginative setting and well-drawn characters if nothing else. So: is it really a children's book? The question is rhetorical ...


1

Question 1 is an open-ended list-based question, and so IMO close-worthy. Open-ended list-based questions such as this one ask "Are there any works that meet such-and-such criteria?" On the one hand, it's hard to prove a negative and give a definite no; maybe there are such works, but potential answerers just don't know of them. And just because ...


1

For the sake of offering a different perspective on these questions, I propose that we interpret them literally instead of as implicit recommendation questions. In other words, interpret questions asking, "Are there any X?" or "Have there been any X" as yes-no-questions, unless there is something in the question body that suggests that the intent is ...


1

As I mentioned in my question I believe that it changes the meaning too much. I believe that the question was changed too much if the answer no longer fits the question. Lets look at the new question alongside with the old answer. The TL:DR of the answer is: TL;DR: a close reading of "The Final Problem" says YES, but a broader analysis would tend to ...


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