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Identification questions are like... The cabbage, radishes and shredded carrots that some sushi shops put on the platter before stacking up the meat & rice. They make the plate look nice and full, and they're something to chew on once you've eaten all the meat... ...But no one goes to a sushi restaurant for shredded carrots. I've never heard a group of ...


15

You may want to sit down. This is going to be long. Identification questions are helpful. Unlike, say, literary analysis, or questions about plot points in specific works of literature, identification questions are almost always inspired by an actual problem someone needs to solve. In this sense, they fit the Stack Exchange model better than many other ...


8

Below is the guidance I propose; it already appears on the tag info page for story-identification since April, but the version below has some minor additions that I did not yet add, now that we have a discussion here. It was shamelessly copied adapted from the relevant discussion on Science Fiction and Fantasy (most heavily from Valorum's answer). I think ...


7

Identification requests are often based on information that is incomplete and sometimes even misremembered, so each answerer makes a best effort starting from an uncertain base. For this reason, I don't think it's fair to delete inaccurate answers based on feedback from the question asker; that would be like moving the goal posts after the answer was ...


6

Story identification questions are on-topic, and comics are on-topic, so comic identification questions should certainly be on-topic. I would, however, tag them with story-identification rather than creating a new comic identification tag. The skills required to identify a comic are much the same as those required to identify any other kind of story, so it ...


5

Explain how your answer matches the question as stated. Any story-ID question is going to include some data points about the story. Don't just say "this is the book you're looking for"; show how each of those data points (or as many as you can) match the book you've found. Ideally you could do this using citations, e.g. quote and link to an online ...


5

Leave it. Even if it's not what the OP of the question was looking for, the answer can still be useful to people who are looking for something similar. Remember, questions are indexed in search engines and people do search for works that they're looking for, and find the questions here; so if someone is searching for something similar, even if it's not what ...


4

Leave the incorrect answer. That way someone who comes upon the question later can see that the OP has already said it’s incorrect. Otherwise that person might make the incorrect suggestion again.


4

The golden rule of migration is "Don't Migrate Crap". Story identification questions on this site must be as detailed as possible, with a few suggestions outlined in Guidelines for good story-id questions?; the tag info page is also always a good place to look. I'm a bit of a regular in the Anime&Manga chat room, and from what I see, there aren't too ...


4

Personally, I only use the author tag I see most relevant. E.g. when asking about the story, I use the writer tag. When asking about the art, or the lettering, I use another tag. For the titles - our last ruling (though still a bit inconclusive IMO) seems to be in favour of title tags. Please note that it's better to use a franchise (or book series or ...


1

story-identification questions should only be closed as duplicates where both answers are accepted, regardless of the similarity between them. (If the OP posts a "yes this is it" comment, that's as good as an acceptance.) Simple, easy to administer.


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